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Men: – How To Give Yourself A Facial At Home.

 

Image result for black man facial mask

No longer the sole reserve of the fairer sex, increasing numbers of men are realizing that even the toughest of skin requires a little TLC now and again. According to research by Mintel, last year 20 per cent of fellas treated themselves to a professional skincare treatment – but if you’re still not ready to step into the spa, or are trying to save money for your summer wardrobe updates, all is not lost.

Step One: Cleanse

“Skin damage from shaving routines can’t be fixed with soap and water so, really, men probably need facials more than women thanks to their coarser skin and larger pores,” says facialist Jordan Samuel Pacitti. This means cleansing your skin to rid it of any residual gunk is vital to achieving salon-level results.

“Lightly rub with cleansing cream, and leave it on your skin for at least two minutes to give it chance to dissolve any dirt and oil. Then wipe your face – gently – with cotton wool.”

Step Two: Exfoliate

“Exfoliation clears out and refines the skin’s surface, so it’s important not to scrimp on this step,” muses Pacitti. “To remove deep-seated dirt and dry skin, moisten with warm water and gently massage some facial scrub onto your face, avoiding the delicate area around your eyes, then rinse it off with lukewarm water. Just don’t scrub too hard or do it too frequently or you will damage your epidermis.”

Step Three: Steam

Anyone who follows Dr Pimple Popper on Instagram will know the best bit of any facial is the ‘extractions’ (the process of clearing a clogged pore by manual or mechanical means). To do them properly at home, you’re going to need to get steamy. This will help with the pain of removing spots, blackheads and whiteheads – which shouldn’t be underestimated.

“The majority of women have an understanding that a certain amount of pain comes with beauty [treatments], waxing or whatever. And then come the men – guys who can play football, who can lift refrigerators – and they’re cringing, whimpering. I’ve had crying in my room. I’m totally serious,” says aesthetician Hillary Sklar.

“Steam will loosen any build-up, go grab a 5X mirror, and place a bowl of boiling water in front of you. Then, lean over the bowl and cover your head with a towel so that the steam will reach your face, and stay in that position for about five minutes. You should then be able to pinch out any blemishes with minimal pain.”

Image result for mens towel and bowl facial steam

Step Four: Mask

“The years and unhealthy living remove the moisture from your skin,” says Hollywood facialist Su-Man Hsu. “A mask helps to put it back.”

Masks are available from a variety of grooming brands at various price points, but the most important thing is to pick one that is formulated for your skin type. “If you have an oily face, go for an exfoliating or clay-based mask, and for dry skin, opt for an intensive moisturizing one. Then ensure you follow the instructions to the letter” according to the experts at Natura Bisse.

Step Five: Close Your Pores

Once the mask is done with, remove it with warm water. Your pores will be open after this, so to prevent dirt from entering, you need to close them back up again.

“To do this, simply splash your face with cold water, concentrating on your nose and wherever you’ve got large pores, then dry your skin by gently dabbing with a soft flannel,” say the experts at skincare gurus Natura Bissé.

Image result for man washing his face

Step Six: Tone Up

Although it’s often the step that’s skipped, toner shouldn’t be ignored – it’s the key to refreshing your skin and getting rid of oil. “Apply a toner on areas prone to acne and blemishes,” says Sklar. “The only exception is if you have very dry skin, as they will make your skin [even] drier.”

Step Seven: Eyes

The most common reason men visit skincare specialists is to reduce dark circles and puffiness from under the eyes. “Treating your eye bags can be as important as the rest of the treatment,” says Pacitti. “Apply a generous amount of eye cream or gel on the areas surrounding your eyes and rub it in gently using a circular motion.”

Step Eight: Moisturize

After the previous seven steps, your face will be crying out for moisture. “The most vital step is moisturizer as this is essential to keeping your skin soft, supple and even throughout the years,” say Natura Bisse’s experts.

“After a facial, opt for something with more weight to it than your usual moisturizer, and be sure to let it soak in naturally.”

Lipstick (Part 3)

Ingredients

Lipstick Story image for lipstick ingredients from Rackedcontains wax, oils, antioxidants and emollients. Wax provides the structure to the solid lipstick. Lipsticks may be made from several waxes such as beeswax, ozokerite and candelilla wax. Because of its high melting point, Carnauba wax is a key ingredient in terms of strengthening the lipstick. Various oils and fats are used in lipsticks, such as olive oil, mineral oil, cocoa butter, lanolin, and petrolatum. Lead and other trace metals are also found in many lipsticks. It is impossible to know whether these metals are in the lipstick by looking at the ingredient list because they are not an intentional ingredient added, but rather, an unintentional contaminant.

Lipsticks get their colors from a variety of pigments and lake dyes including, but not limited to bromo acid, D&C Red No. 21, Calcium Lake such as D&C Red 7 and D&C Red 34, and D&C Orange No. 17. Pink lipsticks are made by mixing white titanium dioxide and red shades. Both organic and inorganic pigments are employed.

Matte lipsticks contain more filling agents like silica but do not have many emollients. Creme lipsticks contain more waxes than oils. Sheer and long lasting lipsticks contain more oil, while long lasting lipsticks also contain silicone oil, which seals the colors to the wearer’s lips. Glossy lipstick contain more oil to give a shiny finish to the lips. Shimmery or frost lipstick may contain mica, silica, and synthetic pearl particles, such as bismuth oxychloride, to give them a glittery or shimmering shine.

Story image for lipstick ingredients from Good Herald

Lipstick is made from grinding and heating ingredients. Then heated waxes are added to the mix for texture. Oils and lanolin are added for specific formula requirements. Afterwards, the hot liquid is poured onto a metal mold. The mixture is then chilled. Once they have hardened, they are heated in flame for half a second to create a shiny finish and to remove imperfections.

Lead Traces

In 2007, a study by the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics released a report called “A Poison Kiss” that tested 33 popular brands of lipstick for its lead content. The study found that 61 percent of lipsticks contained lead with levels up to 0.65 parts per million (ppm). The study done by the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics brought about public knowledge and put pressure on the FDA to conduct their own studies using a specialized testing method. In 2009, the FDA released a follow-up study to the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics’ report and found lead in all 20 samples tested. The lead levels ranged from 0.09 to 3.06 ppm. The highest lead levels in the 2009 FDA study were in lipsticks made by Cover Girl, L’Oreal, and Revlon.

In 2010, the FDA conducted an expanded survey on its previous study, which broadened the testing to 400 lipsticks that were available on the U.S. market at the time. This study was done by Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. using the same testing method as 2009. This study found an average of 1.11 ppm compared to the 1.07 ppm average in the 2009 study. The maximum lead level found was 7.19 ppm in Maybelline’s Color Sensational 125 – Pink Petal. This is over two times the maximum limit found in the 2009 study.

Lead is not listed as an ingredient in lipstick, but trace amounts can be found in the mineral based additives. Lead is naturally occurring in soil, water, and air. This means that lead can find its way into the raw ingredients used in lipstick color additives. The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics made a list of chemicals for concern, which can contain toxic chemicals such as lead. While only trace amounts of lead are ingested from lipstick, lead accumulates in the body, which can lead to lead poisoning. The most common users of lipstick are teens and adult women. A study done by the University of California – Berkley found that women applied lipstick anywhere from two to fourteen times a day. This translates to up to 87 milligrams of product ingestion per day. Lead ingestion is particularly concerning for pregnant women because lead can enter the fetus from the mother. The FDA is the regulating body of cosmetic safety under the FD&C Act. Cosmetics regulated by the FD&C Act do not need to be approved for pre-market sale, but pre-market approval is required for the color additives used in lipsticks. Currently the FDA has not set an acceptable lead limit level for lipsticks specifically, but it has set specifications for lead in the color additives used in lipstick. The FDA’s maximum lead limit level is 20 parts per million in cosmetics; however since lipstick is absorbed through the skin and only ingested in very small quantities, the FDA does not “consider the lead levels we found in the lipsticks to be a safety concern”. The CDC, on the other hand, reports that there is no safe blood level for lead, and that even low levels of lead affect IQ, the ability to pay attention, and academic achievement. The effects of lead exposure are not able to be corrected.

Lipstick (Part 2)

Lipstick Trends

Throughout the early 20th century, lipstick came in a limited number of shades. Dark red was one of the most popular shade throughout the 19th and 20th century. Dark red lipstick was popular in the 1920s. Flappers wore lipstick to symbolize their independence. Lipstick was worn around the lips to form a “Cupid’s bow,” inspired by actress Clara Bow. At that time, it was acceptable to apply lipstick in public and during lunch, but never at dinner. In the early 1930s, Elizabeth Arden began to introduce different lipstick colors. She inspired other companies to create a variety of lipstick shades. In the 1930s, lipstick was seen as symbol of adult sexuality. Teenage girls believed that lipstick was a symbol of womanhood. Adults saw it as an act of rebellion. Many Americans, especially immigrants, did not accept teenage girls wearing lipstick. A study in 1937 survey revealed that over 50% of teenage girls fought with their parents over lipstick.

In the mid-1940s, several teen books and magazines stressed that men prefer a natural look over a made-up look. Books and magazines also warned girls that wearing cosmetics could ruin their chances of popularity and a career. The implication of these articles was that lipstick and rouge were for teen girls who acted very provocatively with men. Despite the increased use of cosmetics, it was still associated with prostitution. Teen girls were discouraged from wearing cosmetics for fear that they would be mistaken for “loose” girls or prostitutes.

By the 1950s, movie actresses Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor helped bring back dark red lips. A 1951 survey revealed that two-thirds of teenage girls wore lipstick. In 1950 chemist Hazel Bishop formed a company, Hazel Bishop Inc., to promote her invention of long-lasting, non-smearing ‘kissproof’ lipstick (“stays on you… not on him”), which quickly gained acceptance. At the end of the 1950s, a cosmetic company named Gala introduced pale shimmery lipstick. Later, Max Factor created a popular lipstick color called Strawberry Meringue. Lipstick manufacturers began creating lipsticks in lavender, pale pink, white, and peach. Since parents generally frowned on teen girls wearing red lipstick, some teen girls began wearing pink and peach lipsticks, which became a trend. White or nearly white lipstick was popular in the 1960s. Rock groups such as the Ronettes and the Shirelles popularized white lipstick. Girls would apply white lipstick over pink lipstick or place under-eye concealer on their lips. During that time, many lipsticks were either matte, sheer, or slightly shiny. In the 1960s, lipstick was associated with femininity. Women who did not wear lipstick were suspected of mental illness or lesbianism. In the 1970s, a number of cosmetic companies introduced lipsticks in more unusual colors such as iridescent light blue (Kanebo), frosted lime green (Conga Lime by Revlon), and silver sparkled navy blue (Metallic Grandma by Biba). M•A•C cosmetics continues to release limited edition and highly collectible lipsticks in a wide range of colors and finishes, including unusual hues of violets, blues, and greens. Black lipstick became popular in the late 1970s and into the 1990s. In the 1950s, black lipstick had been worn by actresses starring in horror films. It became popular again due in part to punk and goth subcultures.

In the mid-1980s, so-called mood lipstick were sold to adults by mainstream cosmetic companies. This type of lipstick changes colors after it is applied, based on changes in skin’s pH that supposedly reflect the wearer’s mood. By the 1990s, lipstick colors became semi-matte. Shades of brown were very popular. These shades were inspired by several shows such as “Friends”. In the late 1990s and into the 21st century, pearl shades became very popular. Lipsticks were no longer matte or semi-matte, they were shiny and contained several interference pearls.

In 2012, bright bold lip colors became trendy again with saturated colors such as hot pink, neon, and orange. In 2014 and early 2015 nude lipsticks were coming up to be incredibly popular. These lipsticks follow the general trend where “less is more”. Examples of celebrities promoting this trend are Paris Hilton and Gigi Gorgeous. In late 2015 and 2016 liquid lipstick, which applies like a gloss but dries matte, became popularized with brands such as Anastasia Beverly Hills. Its most common form comes in a tube, applied with an applicator wand. Lipstick also has many variations including lip balms, glosses, crayons, pencils, liners, and stains. Balms and glosses tend to be more translucent and not as dark or vibrant.

Airbrush Makeup Vs Mineral Makeup

While traditional makeup has been around for centuries, mineral makeup (like Bare Minerals) and airbrush makeup (like Luminess Air) have become the talk of the entertainment industry recently. These new forms of makeup offer promises of easier and quicker application while increasing your overall beauty. Do either of them live up to the hype? When comparing airbrush makeup and mineral makeup, which is best for you?

Mineral makeup gained popularity when environmental groups brought to light the chemicals found in traditional makeup brands. Anything mineral-based or organic in nature appeals to huge crowd, so the popularity of more natural makeup is not surprising. Bare Minerals is the most well known of the companies offering mineral makeup due to their heavy infomercial marketing campaigns.

While mineral makeup is quick to apply and feels light on the skin, it does not offer heavy coverage. While that may be a benefit to some, those with age spots, acne, or other skin imperfections may not be pleased with its results. Powdered based, those with dry skin may run into flaky appearances as well. Depending on the brand you choose, mineral makeup can also have an issue with staying power throughout the day. On the plus side, it is less expensive that many professional makeup brands and is easy to travel with.

Airbrush makeup consists of specialized formula of makeup that is thinly sprayed on the face or body by a wand and compressed air. When applied, if offers the same a flawless finish often seen in magazine spreads. Like Bare Minerals, Luminess Air has a strong television presence via infomercials and home shopping channels.

While not perfect, airbrush makeup offers many positive features. When applied, the makeup has amazing staying power, often lasting 16-24 hours. It will not rub on clothes or anything else for that matter. Depending on the brand you use, you can easily mix eye shadow or blush colors, giving you an unlimited number of unique shades of makeup. On the downside, the start-up costs for equipment can be costly. Also, if your face becomes moist (whether from rain, sweat, or other sources of water), the makeup can become streaky and once airbrushed makeup streaks, it is difficult (if not impossible) to touch up.

Our final verdict? If you can afford an airbrush makeup kit, we highly recommend it. After a little bit of practice, you will soon be able to apply professional looking makeup every day of the week!
Source by Emily Grace Hastings

Benefits of TCA Peels For Tattoo and Permanent Makeup Removal

When you are looking to get a tattoo, you are looking towards getting something that will be forever, but what if you change your mind?  The truth of the matter is that the only thing that we can really count on is change, and sometimes, a tattoo that you got months or years or decades ago might not really suit your life anymore.  In other cases, you may find that you are no longer pleased with the  permanent makeup that you have gotten, or you may be in a place where you are looking to try something else  When you are looking to get rid of a tattoo, no matter why you got it in the first place, you will find that taking a look at TCA peels might be just what you are looking to do.

A TCA peel stands for a Trichloroacetic Acid peel and it is a process that has been used by cosmetic dermatologists to treat conditions as different as wrinkle reduction, relief from acne scars and the removal of fine lines.  This treatment is one that is quite potent, and you will find that it is also extremely effective.  There are many treatments out there when it comes to tattoo removal, but you will find that with a little bit of research that looking at TCA tattoo removal may be your most effective and economic option.

When you are looking at TCA peels, you will also find that you are using something that has a real history.  The use of chemical peels to remove unwanted areas of skin as been practiced for centuries, and it was within the last twenty to thirty years that dermatologists have started looking into seeing how they can be used to give a controlled reaction from the chemicals that were in use.

It was discovered that TCA peels gave the best and most consistent results.  Essentially, the TCA peel results in a controlled burn that will take off several layers of skin at once and revealing the fresh skin underneath.  It is important to make sure that only a 20-45% TCA solution is used; if a stronger solution is used, there is a chance that there will be some chance of scarring and darkening of the skin.

When you are looking at the TCA peel, you might be wondering what goes into it.  The truth is that it is very simple and straightforward.  Despite the word “acid,” a TCA peel is actually not as painful as the other methods that are commonly used to get rid of tattoos.  At the end of the treatment, many people compare it to sunburn  or windburn.  You will find that you also have the option of doing at home, on your own or having a dermatologist do it.  Whether you choose to go the solo route or to get a professional to do it for you is largely considered up to you.  You will find that it all depends on how steady your hand is.

How does TCA remove a tattoo? Essentially, when you get ready to use a TCA peel, you will swab up some of the acid on a q-tip and then you will distribute it on your skin.  Essentially, the chemical peel will create an inflammation in the skin above the tattoo.  This inflammation will make the ink in your tattoo break apart and then travel to the top of the layer of dead skin, even as new skin is forming underneath this. One of the real advantages of this method is that the acid is just providing the catalyst for your body doing what it would be doing anyway.  Although there is no bona fide natural process for getting rid of a tattoo, this one might come the closest.

In two weeks, often less, you will find that the treated skin will peel off.  After the skin has sloughed off of your body, you will often find that the tattoo in question is significantly lighter in shade, but that it is definitely not gone yet.  A TCA peel will often take multiple sessions to do its work completely, and it will be safe to do another one in roughly six weeks.  While you will find that TCA peels can be applied sooner, it is actually best to wait and to let all of traces of the chemical peel leave your body before trying another one.  When you are looking for complete removal of a tattoo, remember that you might be looking at several sessions before you get the result that you are after.  You will also find that darker colors tend to take longer to fade than lighter ones.

When you are looking at the risks that go along with this treatment, do keep in mind that everyone reacts differently to things.  For instance, if you have very sensitive skin, you will want to consult with a dermatologist before you try this procedure, and you might find that you want a professional to help you take care of it.  On the other hand, you may find that if you have been working with a 20% solution and that you are not getting the results that you want that you should find a different formula that will give you a more dramatic result.

If you are in a place where you are looking to remove a tattoo or permanent makeup, you will find that figuring out what a TCA peel can do for you is an important thing.  Take some time and make sure that you think about the results that you are looking for, and if you have any doubts, take the time to run them by a dermatologist.  When you want a clean slate in more ways than one, take some time and figure out what this treatment can do for you!

One more extremely important item to remember is that “Not all TCAs are Created Equal!”This is to say that many sellers of TCA are not reputable. Some even sell diluted solutions at exorbitant prices.

Some will actually sell you the TCA without any real directions on how to safely apply and use it. THIS CAN BE VERY DANGEROUS!

It is always best to find a TCA manufacturer/supplier/seller that has a proven Track Record of client results and actual photos.

When you do find the right TCA Tattoo Removal Kit, you will “know” it!  You will find that there are kits that are professionally produced and manufactured.  They will have outstanding prices, low worldwide shipping, and come with totally complete instructions on how to use and apply it.  YOU CANNOT HELP BUT SEE THE TOTAL PROFESSIONALISM.  Visible results and safety are paramount!
Source by Allen Pollick

Everyday Business Woman – Makeup Tips

An issue I notice a majority of women have trouble with is deciding how much or what style of makeup is appropriate for the workplace. What is too much versus how much is enough? What colors or look should I go for? How can I come across as a professional while still looking feminine? All of these are questions I hear from young, female professionals either in the pursuit of a career or just beginning in one. The answer to these questions is actually quite simple.

THE ANSWER: SIMPLE!

Simple makeup is honestly the best answer to thee simple questions. You want the makeup to bring out the natural beauty that every woman has, but not be overly flashy or draw too much attention.

• Pick a foundation that matches your skin tone so you don’t come across as a two-tone woman – neck one color, face another. Also, trying using a matte power so that you don’t become oily or shiny throughout the day. Sometimes work can be stressful and when you start to sweat you don’t want to lose your look. Apply the powder on top of your foundation or instead of it.

• Your eyes are important – enhance them, but don’t go overboard. Again, try to stick to more neutral, skin-tone colors. This would include light bronzes, nudes, browns, lighter pinks, etc. Now, I know you want to bring out the color in your eyes with those bright colors, but you can get the same effect using pastels of those same colors.

• Again on the eyes, mascara is a must and some eyeliner never hurt. Black eyeliner is typically seen as a “no no,” but I don’t see the harm in it as long as it does not appear harsh against your skin tone or you do not apply to much. (Sorry my lovely fair and pale ladies, but you should avoid black eyeliner in the work place!) Brown eyeliner is always safe, but again, never too much! And, again, mascara is a wonderful product because it brings out your eyes without adding too much making you look professional, yet feminine. Don’t forget to line your brows if you have thin ones like me. Pick a brow-liner that is the same color as your hair and try to stay within the bounds of your natural ones.

• Blush is always a good thing, but like I’ve been saying, don’t put too much (and avoid glitters)! Some lighter nude/pinks are perfect on the apples of your cheeks and across your cheekbones. This will create a highlighted effect that will look beautiful under those harsh office lights. A quick swoosh of highlighter in the tops of your cheekbones never hurt either!

• Color on a woman’s lips is one of those subtle things that makes a big difference. Depending on skin tones, a light pink, nude rose, or coral brown would be a perfect accent to your wardrobe. Look for lipsticks with words such as ‘creamy,’ ‘nude,’ ‘sheer,’ ‘cool,’ and ‘warm’ as they tend to be softer and more professional. Top of your lip color with some clear gloss for a little shine and you’re good to go!

THINGS TO AVOID

Now that you know what to look for in your workplace makeup kit, these are things you should avoid. These types of products or colors tend to make you look showy or unprofessional and may even prevent you from being taken seriously amongst your colleagues.

• Try to stay away from those fake looking bronzers in the workplace or tones that are too dark or too light for you. Bronzers make you look like you are attending a fashion show and the wrong color can make you appear washed out or too unnaturally tan.

• When it comes to eye shadow, avoid bright rainbow colors and shimmers because they make you look overly glitzy. You’re going for professional, not high fashion. Blues and greens always tend to stick out regardless of what skin tone they are applied too, so you may have to pass up on those colors.

• The rule with eyeliner and mascara is just not too much, but don’t use fake lashes in the work place. Outside of work, those puppies are beautiful, but in the office they just seem like too much.

• Steer clear of bright blushes, especially those with a ton of shimmer or glitter involved. Bright or deep pinks and reds can make you look strange in a whole new way. Anything from sun burnt to clown-like, but none of them are good. With the shimmer and glitter, it just appears very reflective under office lights and may make you appear greasy.

• Lips – stay away from using bright colors or those colors that aren’t a semi-natural shade (this would include purples, blacks, oranges, etc.). You don’t want people staring at just your mouth as you talk, especially if you are giving a presentation – it can be distracting!

HOW I DO IT

These are the steps I take when I am applying makeup for an interview or a meeting. I have always found it helpful to know how someone else does something and I hope this helps you.

1. Apply skin-tone concealer under the eyes, on the eyelids, and on blemishes. I find dabbing lightly with your fingertips to be the best applicator.

2. Apply a thing layer liquid foundation over entire face and slightly down around the jaw-line. This way you don’t get that line you see on women sometimes at the bottom of their face.

3. Use powder on entire face other than eyelids to get the foundation to “stick.”

4. Line brows with liner. I fill in natural brows and then extend them slightly on the ends to create that very structured look. I also use a brow gel to keep all the hairs in place throughout the day.

5. Apply eyeshadow. This can be done in any different ways. I apply a nude color to the lid, a highlighter color to the place under my brow, and a slightly darker color to the crease. You can buy palettes of eyeshadow with this exactly layout to make it easier.

6. Line the top of my eye and the bottom-outer third. This doesn’t appear as too much, but does make your eyes look bigger and brighter.

7. Apply mascara to top lashes and the bottom-outer third. You want to place the mascara where the eyeliner is because it enhances the effect of the eyeliner.

8. Apply blush to cheekbones. Apply one shade darker blush right under cheekbones. Dust highlighter on the top of your cheekbones. If you have even heard of contouring or shading your makeup – this is it in a simplified form.

9. Apply lipstick and then clear gloss. Sometimes I line my lips with a shade that is slightly darker than the lipstick I choose, but sometimes that can look like “too much.”

10. Walk out the door and into the office – just don’t forget to smile!

By following these tips and guidelines and utilizing my makeup steps, you should be able to wear makeup in a professional way while still looking beautiful and feminine. Good luck out there!
Source by Amber L Contant

Fantasy Make Up

A perfect make up can change the look and appearance of the individuals, completely transforming them to totally different personalities than what they actually are. Fantasy make-ups are typically used for media personalities in order to change their looks and represent the characters that they are supposed to play. These actors play whimsical characters portraying aliens and fairies and other such roles. It might also be used for special occasions and theme parties.

Fantasy make up kits include a wide variety of make up products and accessories starting from glitter glues, creams, color pencils and airbrush paints. One of the most typical features of Fantasy make up lies in its typicality of producing a weird and different appearance. Use of various color patterns and body paints are an essential part of Fantasy make up, trying to represent the distinguished world of non-human elements. The Fantasy characters demand special attention in their projection through television programs and movies where the make up plays a significant role in establishing their extra terrestrial appearances. Fantasy make-ups are quite difficult to acquire perfection and are done by professional make up artists.

Some of the best examples of fantasy make-ups are found through the alien characters portrayed in the various television shows and movies. Some of them include Star Trek, Star Wars, Alien Nation, The Fifth Element, Explorers and Earth Final Conflict to name a few. The expertise with which the make up of these alien characters have been done, reflects the skills and talents required for fantasy make up to make them look real yet scary at times.

Fantasy make up kits can be found on the Internet displaying the different items and accessories essential for the most effective results. Products can vary depending on the facial and body make up, and thus need to be chosen accordingly. Also important are the different accessories and prosthetics required to complement the color and overall appearance brought out through the make up.

Source by Josh Riverside

Simple Makeup Tips & Ideas: Makeup for Hooded Eyes

Hooded eyes are beautiful, characterized by extra skin that falls from the brow bone towards the eyelids and covers them. This feature give the face an alluring sexy look, which a lot of beautiful stars have it, such as Jennifer Lawrence, Blake Lively and Taylor Swift. If you have them, you know well how hard it is to apply makeup on your eyes, as the canvas is partially hidden. There’s no good space to paint eye shadow or draw lines, or even powder. Even though, with the right tools and good tips, you will know how to brighten those hooded eyes of yours, and paint them with the colors you like.

Before you jump into learning how to apply makeup for hooded eyes, make sure you have this trait. Look into the mirror and search for a crease above the eye. If there is a crease, look whether it is hidden when you have wide open eyes. If yes, then you do have hooded eyes. Here’s all you have to know about their makeup..

Bigger Eyelids

With hooded eyes, a bigger eyelid is what you need to have for better makeup. You need to create fake eyelids, that’s for sure, so that the eyelid looks much bigger than it really is. How do you do that? You need to draw a line above your natural eyelid with a dark pencil, and then smudge it well. Then add dark eye shadow above the line and blend it outwards. Your eyes will look bigger with the fake lines above.

The Smoky Eye

Smoky makeup works well with your hooded eyes, as it helps open up the eyes. With hooded eyes, you need to apply smoky metallic makeup the normal way, and the trick here is to add a lot of sparkle. Use shimmery eye shadow, and lots of it, on your entire lid.

The Smoky Eye Upside Down

If you find it hard to apply smoky makeup on your hooded eyes, then rely on the upside-down trick. Focus on the lower lash line, and apply the dark eye shadow on it. Use a light champagne color on the lid and wing it out so that your eyes look bigger.

Fast & simple makeup tips & ideas for your hooded eyes:

– Make the highlighter your best friend. Use it for brighter & bigger eyes.

– Rely on bright vibrant colors that extend past your lids.

– Focus on other features of your face. Apply makeup on your lips when you feel it is hard for you to draw a cat eye.

– To make sure you’ve done your makeup the right way, go big with your makeup. Create an oversized cat eye wing that brings too much drama.

Do you love your eyes?
Source by Kay K