Category Archives: Beauty

Men: – How To Give Yourself A Facial At Home.

 

Image result for black man facial mask

No longer the sole reserve of the fairer sex, increasing numbers of men are realizing that even the toughest of skin requires a little TLC now and again. According to research by Mintel, last year 20 per cent of fellas treated themselves to a professional skincare treatment – but if you’re still not ready to step into the spa, or are trying to save money for your summer wardrobe updates, all is not lost.

Step One: Cleanse

“Skin damage from shaving routines can’t be fixed with soap and water so, really, men probably need facials more than women thanks to their coarser skin and larger pores,” says facialist Jordan Samuel Pacitti. This means cleansing your skin to rid it of any residual gunk is vital to achieving salon-level results.

“Lightly rub with cleansing cream, and leave it on your skin for at least two minutes to give it chance to dissolve any dirt and oil. Then wipe your face – gently – with cotton wool.”

Step Two: Exfoliate

“Exfoliation clears out and refines the skin’s surface, so it’s important not to scrimp on this step,” muses Pacitti. “To remove deep-seated dirt and dry skin, moisten with warm water and gently massage some facial scrub onto your face, avoiding the delicate area around your eyes, then rinse it off with lukewarm water. Just don’t scrub too hard or do it too frequently or you will damage your epidermis.”

Step Three: Steam

Anyone who follows Dr Pimple Popper on Instagram will know the best bit of any facial is the ‘extractions’ (the process of clearing a clogged pore by manual or mechanical means). To do them properly at home, you’re going to need to get steamy. This will help with the pain of removing spots, blackheads and whiteheads – which shouldn’t be underestimated.

“The majority of women have an understanding that a certain amount of pain comes with beauty [treatments], waxing or whatever. And then come the men – guys who can play football, who can lift refrigerators – and they’re cringing, whimpering. I’ve had crying in my room. I’m totally serious,” says aesthetician Hillary Sklar.

“Steam will loosen any build-up, go grab a 5X mirror, and place a bowl of boiling water in front of you. Then, lean over the bowl and cover your head with a towel so that the steam will reach your face, and stay in that position for about five minutes. You should then be able to pinch out any blemishes with minimal pain.”

Image result for mens towel and bowl facial steam

Step Four: Mask

“The years and unhealthy living remove the moisture from your skin,” says Hollywood facialist Su-Man Hsu. “A mask helps to put it back.”

Masks are available from a variety of grooming brands at various price points, but the most important thing is to pick one that is formulated for your skin type. “If you have an oily face, go for an exfoliating or clay-based mask, and for dry skin, opt for an intensive moisturizing one. Then ensure you follow the instructions to the letter” according to the experts at Natura Bisse.

Step Five: Close Your Pores

Once the mask is done with, remove it with warm water. Your pores will be open after this, so to prevent dirt from entering, you need to close them back up again.

“To do this, simply splash your face with cold water, concentrating on your nose and wherever you’ve got large pores, then dry your skin by gently dabbing with a soft flannel,” say the experts at skincare gurus Natura Bissé.

Image result for man washing his face

Step Six: Tone Up

Although it’s often the step that’s skipped, toner shouldn’t be ignored – it’s the key to refreshing your skin and getting rid of oil. “Apply a toner on areas prone to acne and blemishes,” says Sklar. “The only exception is if you have very dry skin, as they will make your skin [even] drier.”

Step Seven: Eyes

The most common reason men visit skincare specialists is to reduce dark circles and puffiness from under the eyes. “Treating your eye bags can be as important as the rest of the treatment,” says Pacitti. “Apply a generous amount of eye cream or gel on the areas surrounding your eyes and rub it in gently using a circular motion.”

Step Eight: Moisturize

After the previous seven steps, your face will be crying out for moisture. “The most vital step is moisturizer as this is essential to keeping your skin soft, supple and even throughout the years,” say Natura Bisse’s experts.

“After a facial, opt for something with more weight to it than your usual moisturizer, and be sure to let it soak in naturally.”

Lipstick (Part 1)

Image result for lipstick

Lipstick is a cosmetic product containing pigments, oils, waxes, and emollients that apply color, texture, and protection to the lips. Many colors and types of lipstick exist. As with most other types of makeup, lipstick is typically, but not exclusively, worn by women. Some lipsticks are also lip balms, to add color and hydration.

Early history

Ancient Americas oldest manual from the 13th century “The Grolier Codex” shows two Mayan woman wearing lipstick. Ancient Sumerian men and women were possibly the first to invent and wear lipstick, about 5,000 years ago. They crushed gemstones and used them to decorate their faces, mainly on the lips and around the eyes. Also Egyptians like Cleopatra crushed bugs to create a color of red on their lips. Around 3000 BC to 1500 BC, women in the ancient Indus Valley Civilization applied red tinted lipstick to their lips for face decoration. Ancient Egyptians wore lipstick to show social status rather than gender. They extracted the red dye from fucus-algin, 0.01% iodine, and some bromine mannite, but this dye resulted in serious illness. Lipsticks with shimmering effects were initially made using a pearlescent substance found in fish scales.

During the Islamic Gold Age the notable Andalusian cosmetologist Abu al-Qasim al-Zahrawi (Abulcasis) invented solid lipsticks, which were perfumed sticks rolled and pressed in special molds, and he described them in his Al-Tasrif. In Australia, Aboriginal girls would paint their mouths red with ocher for puberty rituals.

United Kingdom

Lip coloring started to gain some popularity in 16th-century England. During the time of Queen Elizabeth I bright red lips and a stark white face became fashionable. At that time, lipstick was made from a blend of beeswax and red stains from plants. Only upper class women and male actors wore makeup.

Throughout most of the 19th century the obvious use of cosmetics was not considered acceptable in Britain for respectable women, and it was associated with marginalized groups such as actors and prostitutes. It was considered brazen and uncouth to wear makeup. In the 1850s, reports were being published warning women of the dangers of using lead and vermilion in cosmetics applied to the face. By the end of the 19th century, Guerlain, a French cosmetic company, began to manufacture lipstick. The first commercial lipstick had been invented in 1884, by perfumers in Paris, France. It was covered in silk paper and made from deer tallow, castor oil, and beeswax. Prior to this, lipstick had been created at home. Complete acceptance of the undisguised use of cosmetics in England appears to have arrived for the fashionable Londoner at least by 1921.

In the 19th century, lipstick was colored with carmine dye. Carmine dye was extracted from cochineal, scale insects native to Mexico and Central America which live on cactus plants. Cochineal insects produce carminic acid to deter predation by other insects. Carminic acid, which forms 17% to 24% of the weight of the dried insects, can be extracted from the insect’s body and eggs. Mixed with aluminum or calcium salts it makes carmine dye (also known as cochineal)

This lipstick did not come in a tube; it was applied with a brush. Carmine dye was expensive and the look of carmine colored lipstick was considered unnatural and theatrical, so lipstick was frowned upon for everyday wear. Only actors and actresses could get away with wearing lipstick. In 1880, few stage actresses wore lipstick in public. The famous actress, Sarah Bernhardt, began wearing lipstick and rouge in public. Before the late 19th century, women only applied makeup at home. Bernhardt often applied carmine dye to her lips in public.

In the early 1890s, Carmine was mixed with an oil and wax base. The mixture gave a natural look and it was more acceptable among women. At that time, lipstick was not sold in screw up metal tube; it was sold in paper tubes, tinted papers, or in small pots. The Sears Roebuck catalog first offered rouge for lips and cheeks by the late 1890s. By 1912 fashionable American women had come to consider lipstick acceptable, though an article in the New York Times advised on the need to apply it cautiously.

By 1915, lipstick was sold in cylinder metal containers, which had been invented by Maurice Levy. Women had to slide a tiny lever at the side of the tube with the edge of their fingernail to move the lipstick up to the top of the case, although lipsticks in push-up metal containers had been available in Europe since 1911. In 1923, the first swivel-up tube was patented by James Bruce Mason Jr. in Nashville, Tennessee. As women started to wear lipstick for photographs, photography made lipstick acceptable among women. Elizabeth Arden and Estee Lauder began selling lipstick in their salons.

During the Second World War, metal lipstick tubes were replaced by plastic and paper tubes. Lipstick was scarce during that time because some of the essential ingredients of lipstick, petroleum and castor oil, were unavailable. World War II allowed women to work in engineering and scientific research, and in the late 1940s, Hazel Bishop, an organic chemist in New York and New Jersey, created the first long lasting lipstick, called No-Smear lipstick. With the help of Raymond Specter, an advertiser, Bishop’s lipstick business thrived. Another form of lip color, a wax-free, semi-permanent liquid formula, was invented in the 1990s by the Lip-Ink International company. Other companies have imitated the idea, putting out their own versions of long-lasting “lip stain” or “liquid lip color.”