Monthly Archives: June 2017

Men: – How To Give Yourself A Facial At Home.

 

Image result for black man facial mask

No longer the sole reserve of the fairer sex, increasing numbers of men are realizing that even the toughest of skin requires a little TLC now and again. According to research by Mintel, last year 20 per cent of fellas treated themselves to a professional skincare treatment – but if you’re still not ready to step into the spa, or are trying to save money for your summer wardrobe updates, all is not lost.

Step One: Cleanse

“Skin damage from shaving routines can’t be fixed with soap and water so, really, men probably need facials more than women thanks to their coarser skin and larger pores,” says facialist Jordan Samuel Pacitti. This means cleansing your skin to rid it of any residual gunk is vital to achieving salon-level results.

“Lightly rub with cleansing cream, and leave it on your skin for at least two minutes to give it chance to dissolve any dirt and oil. Then wipe your face – gently – with cotton wool.”

Step Two: Exfoliate

“Exfoliation clears out and refines the skin’s surface, so it’s important not to scrimp on this step,” muses Pacitti. “To remove deep-seated dirt and dry skin, moisten with warm water and gently massage some facial scrub onto your face, avoiding the delicate area around your eyes, then rinse it off with lukewarm water. Just don’t scrub too hard or do it too frequently or you will damage your epidermis.”

Step Three: Steam

Anyone who follows Dr Pimple Popper on Instagram will know the best bit of any facial is the ‘extractions’ (the process of clearing a clogged pore by manual or mechanical means). To do them properly at home, you’re going to need to get steamy. This will help with the pain of removing spots, blackheads and whiteheads – which shouldn’t be underestimated.

“The majority of women have an understanding that a certain amount of pain comes with beauty [treatments], waxing or whatever. And then come the men – guys who can play football, who can lift refrigerators – and they’re cringing, whimpering. I’ve had crying in my room. I’m totally serious,” says aesthetician Hillary Sklar.

“Steam will loosen any build-up, go grab a 5X mirror, and place a bowl of boiling water in front of you. Then, lean over the bowl and cover your head with a towel so that the steam will reach your face, and stay in that position for about five minutes. You should then be able to pinch out any blemishes with minimal pain.”

Image result for mens towel and bowl facial steam

Step Four: Mask

“The years and unhealthy living remove the moisture from your skin,” says Hollywood facialist Su-Man Hsu. “A mask helps to put it back.”

Masks are available from a variety of grooming brands at various price points, but the most important thing is to pick one that is formulated for your skin type. “If you have an oily face, go for an exfoliating or clay-based mask, and for dry skin, opt for an intensive moisturizing one. Then ensure you follow the instructions to the letter” according to the experts at Natura Bisse.

Step Five: Close Your Pores

Once the mask is done with, remove it with warm water. Your pores will be open after this, so to prevent dirt from entering, you need to close them back up again.

“To do this, simply splash your face with cold water, concentrating on your nose and wherever you’ve got large pores, then dry your skin by gently dabbing with a soft flannel,” say the experts at skincare gurus Natura Bissé.

Image result for man washing his face

Step Six: Tone Up

Although it’s often the step that’s skipped, toner shouldn’t be ignored – it’s the key to refreshing your skin and getting rid of oil. “Apply a toner on areas prone to acne and blemishes,” says Sklar. “The only exception is if you have very dry skin, as they will make your skin [even] drier.”

Step Seven: Eyes

The most common reason men visit skincare specialists is to reduce dark circles and puffiness from under the eyes. “Treating your eye bags can be as important as the rest of the treatment,” says Pacitti. “Apply a generous amount of eye cream or gel on the areas surrounding your eyes and rub it in gently using a circular motion.”

Step Eight: Moisturize

After the previous seven steps, your face will be crying out for moisture. “The most vital step is moisturizer as this is essential to keeping your skin soft, supple and even throughout the years,” say Natura Bisse’s experts.

“After a facial, opt for something with more weight to it than your usual moisturizer, and be sure to let it soak in naturally.”

Lipstick (Part 3)

Ingredients

Lipstick Story image for lipstick ingredients from Rackedcontains wax, oils, antioxidants and emollients. Wax provides the structure to the solid lipstick. Lipsticks may be made from several waxes such as beeswax, ozokerite and candelilla wax. Because of its high melting point, Carnauba wax is a key ingredient in terms of strengthening the lipstick. Various oils and fats are used in lipsticks, such as olive oil, mineral oil, cocoa butter, lanolin, and petrolatum. Lead and other trace metals are also found in many lipsticks. It is impossible to know whether these metals are in the lipstick by looking at the ingredient list because they are not an intentional ingredient added, but rather, an unintentional contaminant.

Lipsticks get their colors from a variety of pigments and lake dyes including, but not limited to bromo acid, D&C Red No. 21, Calcium Lake such as D&C Red 7 and D&C Red 34, and D&C Orange No. 17. Pink lipsticks are made by mixing white titanium dioxide and red shades. Both organic and inorganic pigments are employed.

Matte lipsticks contain more filling agents like silica but do not have many emollients. Creme lipsticks contain more waxes than oils. Sheer and long lasting lipsticks contain more oil, while long lasting lipsticks also contain silicone oil, which seals the colors to the wearer’s lips. Glossy lipstick contain more oil to give a shiny finish to the lips. Shimmery or frost lipstick may contain mica, silica, and synthetic pearl particles, such as bismuth oxychloride, to give them a glittery or shimmering shine.

Story image for lipstick ingredients from Good Herald

Lipstick is made from grinding and heating ingredients. Then heated waxes are added to the mix for texture. Oils and lanolin are added for specific formula requirements. Afterwards, the hot liquid is poured onto a metal mold. The mixture is then chilled. Once they have hardened, they are heated in flame for half a second to create a shiny finish and to remove imperfections.

Lead Traces

In 2007, a study by the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics released a report called “A Poison Kiss” that tested 33 popular brands of lipstick for its lead content. The study found that 61 percent of lipsticks contained lead with levels up to 0.65 parts per million (ppm). The study done by the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics brought about public knowledge and put pressure on the FDA to conduct their own studies using a specialized testing method. In 2009, the FDA released a follow-up study to the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics’ report and found lead in all 20 samples tested. The lead levels ranged from 0.09 to 3.06 ppm. The highest lead levels in the 2009 FDA study were in lipsticks made by Cover Girl, L’Oreal, and Revlon.

In 2010, the FDA conducted an expanded survey on its previous study, which broadened the testing to 400 lipsticks that were available on the U.S. market at the time. This study was done by Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. using the same testing method as 2009. This study found an average of 1.11 ppm compared to the 1.07 ppm average in the 2009 study. The maximum lead level found was 7.19 ppm in Maybelline’s Color Sensational 125 – Pink Petal. This is over two times the maximum limit found in the 2009 study.

Lead is not listed as an ingredient in lipstick, but trace amounts can be found in the mineral based additives. Lead is naturally occurring in soil, water, and air. This means that lead can find its way into the raw ingredients used in lipstick color additives. The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics made a list of chemicals for concern, which can contain toxic chemicals such as lead. While only trace amounts of lead are ingested from lipstick, lead accumulates in the body, which can lead to lead poisoning. The most common users of lipstick are teens and adult women. A study done by the University of California – Berkley found that women applied lipstick anywhere from two to fourteen times a day. This translates to up to 87 milligrams of product ingestion per day. Lead ingestion is particularly concerning for pregnant women because lead can enter the fetus from the mother. The FDA is the regulating body of cosmetic safety under the FD&C Act. Cosmetics regulated by the FD&C Act do not need to be approved for pre-market sale, but pre-market approval is required for the color additives used in lipsticks. Currently the FDA has not set an acceptable lead limit level for lipsticks specifically, but it has set specifications for lead in the color additives used in lipstick. The FDA’s maximum lead limit level is 20 parts per million in cosmetics; however since lipstick is absorbed through the skin and only ingested in very small quantities, the FDA does not “consider the lead levels we found in the lipsticks to be a safety concern”. The CDC, on the other hand, reports that there is no safe blood level for lead, and that even low levels of lead affect IQ, the ability to pay attention, and academic achievement. The effects of lead exposure are not able to be corrected.