Monthly Archives: May 2017

Lipstick (Part 2)

Lipstick Trends

Throughout the early 20th century, lipstick came in a limited number of shades. Dark red was one of the most popular shade throughout the 19th and 20th century. Dark red lipstick was popular in the 1920s. Flappers wore lipstick to symbolize their independence. Lipstick was worn around the lips to form a “Cupid’s bow,” inspired by actress Clara Bow. At that time, it was acceptable to apply lipstick in public and during lunch, but never at dinner. In the early 1930s, Elizabeth Arden began to introduce different lipstick colors. She inspired other companies to create a variety of lipstick shades. In the 1930s, lipstick was seen as symbol of adult sexuality. Teenage girls believed that lipstick was a symbol of womanhood. Adults saw it as an act of rebellion. Many Americans, especially immigrants, did not accept teenage girls wearing lipstick. A study in 1937 survey revealed that over 50% of teenage girls fought with their parents over lipstick.

In the mid-1940s, several teen books and magazines stressed that men prefer a natural look over a made-up look. Books and magazines also warned girls that wearing cosmetics could ruin their chances of popularity and a career. The implication of these articles was that lipstick and rouge were for teen girls who acted very provocatively with men. Despite the increased use of cosmetics, it was still associated with prostitution. Teen girls were discouraged from wearing cosmetics for fear that they would be mistaken for “loose” girls or prostitutes.

By the 1950s, movie actresses Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor helped bring back dark red lips. A 1951 survey revealed that two-thirds of teenage girls wore lipstick. In 1950 chemist Hazel Bishop formed a company, Hazel Bishop Inc., to promote her invention of long-lasting, non-smearing ‘kissproof’ lipstick (“stays on you… not on him”), which quickly gained acceptance. At the end of the 1950s, a cosmetic company named Gala introduced pale shimmery lipstick. Later, Max Factor created a popular lipstick color called Strawberry Meringue. Lipstick manufacturers began creating lipsticks in lavender, pale pink, white, and peach. Since parents generally frowned on teen girls wearing red lipstick, some teen girls began wearing pink and peach lipsticks, which became a trend. White or nearly white lipstick was popular in the 1960s. Rock groups such as the Ronettes and the Shirelles popularized white lipstick. Girls would apply white lipstick over pink lipstick or place under-eye concealer on their lips. During that time, many lipsticks were either matte, sheer, or slightly shiny. In the 1960s, lipstick was associated with femininity. Women who did not wear lipstick were suspected of mental illness or lesbianism. In the 1970s, a number of cosmetic companies introduced lipsticks in more unusual colors such as iridescent light blue (Kanebo), frosted lime green (Conga Lime by Revlon), and silver sparkled navy blue (Metallic Grandma by Biba). M•A•C cosmetics continues to release limited edition and highly collectible lipsticks in a wide range of colors and finishes, including unusual hues of violets, blues, and greens. Black lipstick became popular in the late 1970s and into the 1990s. In the 1950s, black lipstick had been worn by actresses starring in horror films. It became popular again due in part to punk and goth subcultures.

In the mid-1980s, so-called mood lipstick were sold to adults by mainstream cosmetic companies. This type of lipstick changes colors after it is applied, based on changes in skin’s pH that supposedly reflect the wearer’s mood. By the 1990s, lipstick colors became semi-matte. Shades of brown were very popular. These shades were inspired by several shows such as “Friends”. In the late 1990s and into the 21st century, pearl shades became very popular. Lipsticks were no longer matte or semi-matte, they were shiny and contained several interference pearls.

In 2012, bright bold lip colors became trendy again with saturated colors such as hot pink, neon, and orange. In 2014 and early 2015 nude lipsticks were coming up to be incredibly popular. These lipsticks follow the general trend where “less is more”. Examples of celebrities promoting this trend are Paris Hilton and Gigi Gorgeous. In late 2015 and 2016 liquid lipstick, which applies like a gloss but dries matte, became popularized with brands such as Anastasia Beverly Hills. Its most common form comes in a tube, applied with an applicator wand. Lipstick also has many variations including lip balms, glosses, crayons, pencils, liners, and stains. Balms and glosses tend to be more translucent and not as dark or vibrant.

Lipstick (Part 1)

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Lipstick is a cosmetic product containing pigments, oils, waxes, and emollients that apply color, texture, and protection to the lips. Many colors and types of lipstick exist. As with most other types of makeup, lipstick is typically, but not exclusively, worn by women. Some lipsticks are also lip balms, to add color and hydration.

Early history

Ancient Americas oldest manual from the 13th century “The Grolier Codex” shows two Mayan woman wearing lipstick. Ancient Sumerian men and women were possibly the first to invent and wear lipstick, about 5,000 years ago. They crushed gemstones and used them to decorate their faces, mainly on the lips and around the eyes. Also Egyptians like Cleopatra crushed bugs to create a color of red on their lips. Around 3000 BC to 1500 BC, women in the ancient Indus Valley Civilization applied red tinted lipstick to their lips for face decoration. Ancient Egyptians wore lipstick to show social status rather than gender. They extracted the red dye from fucus-algin, 0.01% iodine, and some bromine mannite, but this dye resulted in serious illness. Lipsticks with shimmering effects were initially made using a pearlescent substance found in fish scales.

During the Islamic Gold Age the notable Andalusian cosmetologist Abu al-Qasim al-Zahrawi (Abulcasis) invented solid lipsticks, which were perfumed sticks rolled and pressed in special molds, and he described them in his Al-Tasrif. In Australia, Aboriginal girls would paint their mouths red with ocher for puberty rituals.

United Kingdom

Lip coloring started to gain some popularity in 16th-century England. During the time of Queen Elizabeth I bright red lips and a stark white face became fashionable. At that time, lipstick was made from a blend of beeswax and red stains from plants. Only upper class women and male actors wore makeup.

Throughout most of the 19th century the obvious use of cosmetics was not considered acceptable in Britain for respectable women, and it was associated with marginalized groups such as actors and prostitutes. It was considered brazen and uncouth to wear makeup. In the 1850s, reports were being published warning women of the dangers of using lead and vermilion in cosmetics applied to the face. By the end of the 19th century, Guerlain, a French cosmetic company, began to manufacture lipstick. The first commercial lipstick had been invented in 1884, by perfumers in Paris, France. It was covered in silk paper and made from deer tallow, castor oil, and beeswax. Prior to this, lipstick had been created at home. Complete acceptance of the undisguised use of cosmetics in England appears to have arrived for the fashionable Londoner at least by 1921.

In the 19th century, lipstick was colored with carmine dye. Carmine dye was extracted from cochineal, scale insects native to Mexico and Central America which live on cactus plants. Cochineal insects produce carminic acid to deter predation by other insects. Carminic acid, which forms 17% to 24% of the weight of the dried insects, can be extracted from the insect’s body and eggs. Mixed with aluminum or calcium salts it makes carmine dye (also known as cochineal)

This lipstick did not come in a tube; it was applied with a brush. Carmine dye was expensive and the look of carmine colored lipstick was considered unnatural and theatrical, so lipstick was frowned upon for everyday wear. Only actors and actresses could get away with wearing lipstick. In 1880, few stage actresses wore lipstick in public. The famous actress, Sarah Bernhardt, began wearing lipstick and rouge in public. Before the late 19th century, women only applied makeup at home. Bernhardt often applied carmine dye to her lips in public.

In the early 1890s, Carmine was mixed with an oil and wax base. The mixture gave a natural look and it was more acceptable among women. At that time, lipstick was not sold in screw up metal tube; it was sold in paper tubes, tinted papers, or in small pots. The Sears Roebuck catalog first offered rouge for lips and cheeks by the late 1890s. By 1912 fashionable American women had come to consider lipstick acceptable, though an article in the New York Times advised on the need to apply it cautiously.

By 1915, lipstick was sold in cylinder metal containers, which had been invented by Maurice Levy. Women had to slide a tiny lever at the side of the tube with the edge of their fingernail to move the lipstick up to the top of the case, although lipsticks in push-up metal containers had been available in Europe since 1911. In 1923, the first swivel-up tube was patented by James Bruce Mason Jr. in Nashville, Tennessee. As women started to wear lipstick for photographs, photography made lipstick acceptable among women. Elizabeth Arden and Estee Lauder began selling lipstick in their salons.

During the Second World War, metal lipstick tubes were replaced by plastic and paper tubes. Lipstick was scarce during that time because some of the essential ingredients of lipstick, petroleum and castor oil, were unavailable. World War II allowed women to work in engineering and scientific research, and in the late 1940s, Hazel Bishop, an organic chemist in New York and New Jersey, created the first long lasting lipstick, called No-Smear lipstick. With the help of Raymond Specter, an advertiser, Bishop’s lipstick business thrived. Another form of lip color, a wax-free, semi-permanent liquid formula, was invented in the 1990s by the Lip-Ink International company. Other companies have imitated the idea, putting out their own versions of long-lasting “lip stain” or “liquid lip color.”

Wrap Up Your Bad Hair Days

When you’re in a beauty rut, it’s a little like looking in your closet and seeing absolutely nothing to wear. Sure, you have the bones to create a killer look — a bold liner here, a bottle of texture spray there — but sometimes you just need a boost of inspiration. You need to fix your bad hair.

During those occasions where your strands are stressing you out, or your updo is looking like a don’t, is there a better way to combat the bad hair day blues than with a head wrap? (Answer: no). An eloquently-tied scarf isn’t just a simple way to add a bold touch to your outfit — you’re also able to give your tresses a break from heat styling and products, too. Talk about a win-win!
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bad hair

Net-a-Porter Brings It-Girl Brand Ganni to the States

With a new collection called “Stop and Smell the Roses.”

If you feel like you’ve been hearing about the brand Ganni a lot lately, it’s not in your head. Beloved by editors and Instagram It-Girls alike, the Copenhagen-based brand offers up affordable on-trend options with a signature Scandinavian touch.

Today the brand joins forces with Net-a-Porter for an exclusive capsule collection, “Stop and Smell the Roses,” we predict you’ll be wearing all summer. Made up of 12 pieces that each feature a lovely rose print, the breezy dresses, lace bodysuits, t-shirts, and more seamlessly fit with what you already have in your closet. “Net-A-Porter is such an institution of Britishness, and so I felt it was natural to work with roses for the collection as they have a very English aesthetic,” says Ditte Reffstrup, the creative director of Ganni. “I wanted to do something really feminine and soft. And in these days where everything is so busy I think it’s nice to remind people to stop and smell the roses.”

And when you contrast these delicate pieces with ones that offer a bit of edge, we’re sure you’ll get stopped and asked where you got that Ganni.

How Your Prostate Changes With Age

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Prostate Changes Throughout The Years

As the human body ages, there are changes to the male
reproductive system. Unlike women who experience a sudden change in fertility,
men experience reproductive changes over time. Growing older can effect such
things as urinary function and output. Although there is no way to prevent prostate
changes from occurring, early and proper treatment for other health conditions
can help detect any abnormal growth changes that can interfere with the
enjoyment of life.

The prostate is a small gland found in the male reproductive
system responsible for the production of semen. By the time a man is in his
20’s, his prostate is the size of a walnut. In his 40’s, the prostate has grown
to the size of an apricot. 20 years later at 60 years of age, the prostate
grows to the size of a lemon. As the prostate continues to enlarge over time it
pushes against the bladder and urethra. This pressure can cause urinary
function difficulties associated with prostatitis. Prostatitis is the swelling
of the prostate that can lead to a bacterial infection. Pressure placed on the
urethra due to inflammation can be associated with many symptoms that include:

Burning or stinging when passing urine Pain in the groin Trouble
passing urine Small urine output, despite feeling a strong urge to go Flu like
symptoms Sexual dysfunction Low sex drive

  Image result for prostate

With the prostate gradually increasing in size over time, many
men experience sexual dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction is a condition that
results in an inability to achieve and maintain an erection. This condition can
last for years or a lifetime. Although erectile dysfunction can be caused by
other underlying medical conditions such as diabetes, it is often a result of
an enlarged prostate. With pain and pressure put on the groin because of
prostatitis, men can experience ejaculatory problems due to an inflamed
prostate putting pressure against the urethra.Benign prostatic hyperplasia
(BPH) is another condition in which the prostate is enlarged due to the growth
of abnormal cells. BPH shares many symptoms with prostatitis like trouble
urinating, but it can lead to more serious complications. If abnormal cells
have grown to where it restricts the bladder from fully emptying, urine can
backflow causing bladder and kidney infections. Over time if BPH is not treated
properly the flow of urine can be blocked completely leading to kidney failure.
In some cases of prostate growth, abnormal cells can be cancerous. As a man
ages the likelihood of developing prostate cancer increases. Men in their 40’s
have a 1 in 10,000 chance of being diagnosed with cancer. By the time a man is
in his 60’s, the likelihood of being diagnosed increases to 1 in 15 men according
to Cancer Treatment Centers of America.

While the symptoms of prostate cancer can develop slowly, a
man’s risk of being diagnosed increases with age. Abnormal cellular growth
often increases inflammation of the prostate, causing a variety of symptoms
form urinary problems to erectile dysfunction. Although symptoms can worsen
with age causing bacterial infections and inflammation due to prostatitis and
benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), conditions with the prostate are treatable,
but not preventable.

 

Airbrush Makeup Vs Mineral Makeup

While traditional makeup has been around for centuries, mineral makeup (like Bare Minerals) and airbrush makeup (like Luminess Air) have become the talk of the entertainment industry recently. These new forms of makeup offer promises of easier and quicker application while increasing your overall beauty. Do either of them live up to the hype? When comparing airbrush makeup and mineral makeup, which is best for you?

Mineral makeup gained popularity when environmental groups brought to light the chemicals found in traditional makeup brands. Anything mineral-based or organic in nature appeals to huge crowd, so the popularity of more natural makeup is not surprising. Bare Minerals is the most well known of the companies offering mineral makeup due to their heavy infomercial marketing campaigns.

While mineral makeup is quick to apply and feels light on the skin, it does not offer heavy coverage. While that may be a benefit to some, those with age spots, acne, or other skin imperfections may not be pleased with its results. Powdered based, those with dry skin may run into flaky appearances as well. Depending on the brand you choose, mineral makeup can also have an issue with staying power throughout the day. On the plus side, it is less expensive that many professional makeup brands and is easy to travel with.

Airbrush makeup consists of specialized formula of makeup that is thinly sprayed on the face or body by a wand and compressed air. When applied, if offers the same a flawless finish often seen in magazine spreads. Like Bare Minerals, Luminess Air has a strong television presence via infomercials and home shopping channels.

While not perfect, airbrush makeup offers many positive features. When applied, the makeup has amazing staying power, often lasting 16-24 hours. It will not rub on clothes or anything else for that matter. Depending on the brand you use, you can easily mix eye shadow or blush colors, giving you an unlimited number of unique shades of makeup. On the downside, the start-up costs for equipment can be costly. Also, if your face becomes moist (whether from rain, sweat, or other sources of water), the makeup can become streaky and once airbrushed makeup streaks, it is difficult (if not impossible) to touch up.

Our final verdict? If you can afford an airbrush makeup kit, we highly recommend it. After a little bit of practice, you will soon be able to apply professional looking makeup every day of the week!
Source by Emily Grace Hastings

Benefits of TCA Peels For Tattoo and Permanent Makeup Removal

When you are looking to get a tattoo, you are looking towards getting something that will be forever, but what if you change your mind?  The truth of the matter is that the only thing that we can really count on is change, and sometimes, a tattoo that you got months or years or decades ago might not really suit your life anymore.  In other cases, you may find that you are no longer pleased with the  permanent makeup that you have gotten, or you may be in a place where you are looking to try something else  When you are looking to get rid of a tattoo, no matter why you got it in the first place, you will find that taking a look at TCA peels might be just what you are looking to do.

A TCA peel stands for a Trichloroacetic Acid peel and it is a process that has been used by cosmetic dermatologists to treat conditions as different as wrinkle reduction, relief from acne scars and the removal of fine lines.  This treatment is one that is quite potent, and you will find that it is also extremely effective.  There are many treatments out there when it comes to tattoo removal, but you will find that with a little bit of research that looking at TCA tattoo removal may be your most effective and economic option.

When you are looking at TCA peels, you will also find that you are using something that has a real history.  The use of chemical peels to remove unwanted areas of skin as been practiced for centuries, and it was within the last twenty to thirty years that dermatologists have started looking into seeing how they can be used to give a controlled reaction from the chemicals that were in use.

It was discovered that TCA peels gave the best and most consistent results.  Essentially, the TCA peel results in a controlled burn that will take off several layers of skin at once and revealing the fresh skin underneath.  It is important to make sure that only a 20-45% TCA solution is used; if a stronger solution is used, there is a chance that there will be some chance of scarring and darkening of the skin.

When you are looking at the TCA peel, you might be wondering what goes into it.  The truth is that it is very simple and straightforward.  Despite the word “acid,” a TCA peel is actually not as painful as the other methods that are commonly used to get rid of tattoos.  At the end of the treatment, many people compare it to sunburn  or windburn.  You will find that you also have the option of doing at home, on your own or having a dermatologist do it.  Whether you choose to go the solo route or to get a professional to do it for you is largely considered up to you.  You will find that it all depends on how steady your hand is.

How does TCA remove a tattoo? Essentially, when you get ready to use a TCA peel, you will swab up some of the acid on a q-tip and then you will distribute it on your skin.  Essentially, the chemical peel will create an inflammation in the skin above the tattoo.  This inflammation will make the ink in your tattoo break apart and then travel to the top of the layer of dead skin, even as new skin is forming underneath this. One of the real advantages of this method is that the acid is just providing the catalyst for your body doing what it would be doing anyway.  Although there is no bona fide natural process for getting rid of a tattoo, this one might come the closest.

In two weeks, often less, you will find that the treated skin will peel off.  After the skin has sloughed off of your body, you will often find that the tattoo in question is significantly lighter in shade, but that it is definitely not gone yet.  A TCA peel will often take multiple sessions to do its work completely, and it will be safe to do another one in roughly six weeks.  While you will find that TCA peels can be applied sooner, it is actually best to wait and to let all of traces of the chemical peel leave your body before trying another one.  When you are looking for complete removal of a tattoo, remember that you might be looking at several sessions before you get the result that you are after.  You will also find that darker colors tend to take longer to fade than lighter ones.

When you are looking at the risks that go along with this treatment, do keep in mind that everyone reacts differently to things.  For instance, if you have very sensitive skin, you will want to consult with a dermatologist before you try this procedure, and you might find that you want a professional to help you take care of it.  On the other hand, you may find that if you have been working with a 20% solution and that you are not getting the results that you want that you should find a different formula that will give you a more dramatic result.

If you are in a place where you are looking to remove a tattoo or permanent makeup, you will find that figuring out what a TCA peel can do for you is an important thing.  Take some time and make sure that you think about the results that you are looking for, and if you have any doubts, take the time to run them by a dermatologist.  When you want a clean slate in more ways than one, take some time and figure out what this treatment can do for you!

One more extremely important item to remember is that “Not all TCAs are Created Equal!”This is to say that many sellers of TCA are not reputable. Some even sell diluted solutions at exorbitant prices.

Some will actually sell you the TCA without any real directions on how to safely apply and use it. THIS CAN BE VERY DANGEROUS!

It is always best to find a TCA manufacturer/supplier/seller that has a proven Track Record of client results and actual photos.

When you do find the right TCA Tattoo Removal Kit, you will “know” it!  You will find that there are kits that are professionally produced and manufactured.  They will have outstanding prices, low worldwide shipping, and come with totally complete instructions on how to use and apply it.  YOU CANNOT HELP BUT SEE THE TOTAL PROFESSIONALISM.  Visible results and safety are paramount!
Source by Allen Pollick

Everyday Business Woman – Makeup Tips

An issue I notice a majority of women have trouble with is deciding how much or what style of makeup is appropriate for the workplace. What is too much versus how much is enough? What colors or look should I go for? How can I come across as a professional while still looking feminine? All of these are questions I hear from young, female professionals either in the pursuit of a career or just beginning in one. The answer to these questions is actually quite simple.

THE ANSWER: SIMPLE!

Simple makeup is honestly the best answer to thee simple questions. You want the makeup to bring out the natural beauty that every woman has, but not be overly flashy or draw too much attention.

• Pick a foundation that matches your skin tone so you don’t come across as a two-tone woman – neck one color, face another. Also, trying using a matte power so that you don’t become oily or shiny throughout the day. Sometimes work can be stressful and when you start to sweat you don’t want to lose your look. Apply the powder on top of your foundation or instead of it.

• Your eyes are important – enhance them, but don’t go overboard. Again, try to stick to more neutral, skin-tone colors. This would include light bronzes, nudes, browns, lighter pinks, etc. Now, I know you want to bring out the color in your eyes with those bright colors, but you can get the same effect using pastels of those same colors.

• Again on the eyes, mascara is a must and some eyeliner never hurt. Black eyeliner is typically seen as a “no no,” but I don’t see the harm in it as long as it does not appear harsh against your skin tone or you do not apply to much. (Sorry my lovely fair and pale ladies, but you should avoid black eyeliner in the work place!) Brown eyeliner is always safe, but again, never too much! And, again, mascara is a wonderful product because it brings out your eyes without adding too much making you look professional, yet feminine. Don’t forget to line your brows if you have thin ones like me. Pick a brow-liner that is the same color as your hair and try to stay within the bounds of your natural ones.

• Blush is always a good thing, but like I’ve been saying, don’t put too much (and avoid glitters)! Some lighter nude/pinks are perfect on the apples of your cheeks and across your cheekbones. This will create a highlighted effect that will look beautiful under those harsh office lights. A quick swoosh of highlighter in the tops of your cheekbones never hurt either!

• Color on a woman’s lips is one of those subtle things that makes a big difference. Depending on skin tones, a light pink, nude rose, or coral brown would be a perfect accent to your wardrobe. Look for lipsticks with words such as ‘creamy,’ ‘nude,’ ‘sheer,’ ‘cool,’ and ‘warm’ as they tend to be softer and more professional. Top of your lip color with some clear gloss for a little shine and you’re good to go!

THINGS TO AVOID

Now that you know what to look for in your workplace makeup kit, these are things you should avoid. These types of products or colors tend to make you look showy or unprofessional and may even prevent you from being taken seriously amongst your colleagues.

• Try to stay away from those fake looking bronzers in the workplace or tones that are too dark or too light for you. Bronzers make you look like you are attending a fashion show and the wrong color can make you appear washed out or too unnaturally tan.

• When it comes to eye shadow, avoid bright rainbow colors and shimmers because they make you look overly glitzy. You’re going for professional, not high fashion. Blues and greens always tend to stick out regardless of what skin tone they are applied too, so you may have to pass up on those colors.

• The rule with eyeliner and mascara is just not too much, but don’t use fake lashes in the work place. Outside of work, those puppies are beautiful, but in the office they just seem like too much.

• Steer clear of bright blushes, especially those with a ton of shimmer or glitter involved. Bright or deep pinks and reds can make you look strange in a whole new way. Anything from sun burnt to clown-like, but none of them are good. With the shimmer and glitter, it just appears very reflective under office lights and may make you appear greasy.

• Lips – stay away from using bright colors or those colors that aren’t a semi-natural shade (this would include purples, blacks, oranges, etc.). You don’t want people staring at just your mouth as you talk, especially if you are giving a presentation – it can be distracting!

HOW I DO IT

These are the steps I take when I am applying makeup for an interview or a meeting. I have always found it helpful to know how someone else does something and I hope this helps you.

1. Apply skin-tone concealer under the eyes, on the eyelids, and on blemishes. I find dabbing lightly with your fingertips to be the best applicator.

2. Apply a thing layer liquid foundation over entire face and slightly down around the jaw-line. This way you don’t get that line you see on women sometimes at the bottom of their face.

3. Use powder on entire face other than eyelids to get the foundation to “stick.”

4. Line brows with liner. I fill in natural brows and then extend them slightly on the ends to create that very structured look. I also use a brow gel to keep all the hairs in place throughout the day.

5. Apply eyeshadow. This can be done in any different ways. I apply a nude color to the lid, a highlighter color to the place under my brow, and a slightly darker color to the crease. You can buy palettes of eyeshadow with this exactly layout to make it easier.

6. Line the top of my eye and the bottom-outer third. This doesn’t appear as too much, but does make your eyes look bigger and brighter.

7. Apply mascara to top lashes and the bottom-outer third. You want to place the mascara where the eyeliner is because it enhances the effect of the eyeliner.

8. Apply blush to cheekbones. Apply one shade darker blush right under cheekbones. Dust highlighter on the top of your cheekbones. If you have even heard of contouring or shading your makeup – this is it in a simplified form.

9. Apply lipstick and then clear gloss. Sometimes I line my lips with a shade that is slightly darker than the lipstick I choose, but sometimes that can look like “too much.”

10. Walk out the door and into the office – just don’t forget to smile!

By following these tips and guidelines and utilizing my makeup steps, you should be able to wear makeup in a professional way while still looking beautiful and feminine. Good luck out there!
Source by Amber L Contant

Fantasy Make Up

A perfect make up can change the look and appearance of the individuals, completely transforming them to totally different personalities than what they actually are. Fantasy make-ups are typically used for media personalities in order to change their looks and represent the characters that they are supposed to play. These actors play whimsical characters portraying aliens and fairies and other such roles. It might also be used for special occasions and theme parties.

Fantasy make up kits include a wide variety of make up products and accessories starting from glitter glues, creams, color pencils and airbrush paints. One of the most typical features of Fantasy make up lies in its typicality of producing a weird and different appearance. Use of various color patterns and body paints are an essential part of Fantasy make up, trying to represent the distinguished world of non-human elements. The Fantasy characters demand special attention in their projection through television programs and movies where the make up plays a significant role in establishing their extra terrestrial appearances. Fantasy make-ups are quite difficult to acquire perfection and are done by professional make up artists.

Some of the best examples of fantasy make-ups are found through the alien characters portrayed in the various television shows and movies. Some of them include Star Trek, Star Wars, Alien Nation, The Fifth Element, Explorers and Earth Final Conflict to name a few. The expertise with which the make up of these alien characters have been done, reflects the skills and talents required for fantasy make up to make them look real yet scary at times.

Fantasy make up kits can be found on the Internet displaying the different items and accessories essential for the most effective results. Products can vary depending on the facial and body make up, and thus need to be chosen accordingly. Also important are the different accessories and prosthetics required to complement the color and overall appearance brought out through the make up.

Source by Josh Riverside